Thursday, January 12, 2017

Where in the world is the bird flu?

It wasn't too long ago that we were battling bird flu here in the United States and it was constantly in the news. Talk of bird flu has recently quieted and you might think it is no longer an issue. However, the linked article takes a look at bird flu around the world currently and it is evident it is still something to keep an eye on and protect against. Read through the linked article and utilize the discussion points below to guide you conversations around the globe.

Bird Flu Latest - H5N8 Outbreaks Around Europe and Beyond

Discussion Points

  • Where are we currently seeing bird flu outbreaks around the world?
  • What types of birds are being impacted?
  • Is there anything that surprised you or you found interesting from this article? Explain.
  • Has your home area dealt with bird flu recently or in the past? 
  • Assume the role of an agriculture/poultry expert. How would you slow/stop the spread of bird flu?

15 comments:

Unknown said...

What is the reason that all of these outbreaks are occurring in Europe? The virus must have started there and how long will it be until it spreads to the United States and the rest of the world? - G.M.C Somonauk

Unknown said...

Since I was young, the word influenza has always caused me to associate with the words headache, fever, and nausea. Growing up learning about the human flu, or a sickness that affects many people during the long winter months, this blog post led me to a new discovery as the word bird was thrown into place. After reading the attached article and diving deeper into the abundance of resources on the avian influenza, I have gathered that the bird flu, although not recently posted about in the headlines, is still causing problems around the world, especially in many major European countries. In areas like Germany, Hungary, and Poland, it has recently been determined that common backyard birds as well as cultivated chickens, turkeys, and ducks are more susceptible to this disease that is spread through bird droppings, saliva, and close contact with infected birds. From a greater perspective, if I were to try and put an end to this epidemic, one of my small pieces of advice to those who have been affected by this virus would be to improve fencing and caging to separate species and protect them from wild birds. Also, if I was an agriculture expert, it would be my duty to ensure that the cooking procedure for meat preparation was being followed and taught in areas that may not be concerned with the safety of the meals they are providing. Although this will not end all cases of the bird flu, it can be a step in the right direction to protect families and other fowl. Overall, this article and my side research greatly opened my eyes to a new problem that is occurring in many parts of the world.
-R.M.O Somonauk

Unknown said...

After reading this blog post and the attached article I was able to delve into the abundance of available research on this serious virus learning that; bird flu also called the avian influenza is a contagious disease caused by a strain of the influenza virus. This deadly virus was first discovered in Italy in 1878. Bird flu has two forms, a mild form and a fatal form that can cause death within twenty-four hours of the first appearance of symptoms. All birds are believed to be susceptible to the virus, though some species seem to have more resistance than others. Migratory birds such as ducks and geese often carry the virus, but seem to have the most resistance to severe infection. Domestic poultry like chickens and turkeys are especially vulnerable to avian flu outbreaks and are the least likely to recover from the disease. Some researchers believe contact between waterfowl and poultry may be a frequent cause of epidemics. If I were to assume the role of an agriculture poultry expert, in order to slow and eventually stop the spread of the avian influenza I would strongly recommend the reduction of live bird markets where caged birds are kept in close quarters. These markets have been cited as a way of spreading the bird flu. The virus can spread directly from bird to bird, and from farm to farm through contaminated equipment like cages, feed, clothing, vehicles, and shoes. Just as any virus does the bird flu rears its ugly head every few years and causes yet another epidemic, luckily the virus has been contained during each outbreak in time before it causes a catastrophic pandemic. During this go around the avian flu has appeared in the western part of Eurasia in countries like Germany, Hungary, and Poland. - C.R.J. Somonauk

JP said...

Prior to reading the article I had no idea that the bird flu posed such a large threat to other nations. The United States has not recently experienced an outbreak of this contagious disease also known as avian influenza. Almost every bird susceptible to this severely contagious disease. In countries like Germany, Romania, Bulgaria and more, there are many birds that have been diagnosed with this disease. Many of these birds include geese, swans, turkeys and other wild flocks; quite a few of the outbreaks were discovered in birds living on farms. If it were up to me to put and end to the bird flu, or at least find a way to keep it somewhat contained, I would improve conditions for birds that are raises on farms. Since these birds come in the closest contact with humans, I think it would be best if they were contained better in order to prevent them from contracting the disease from other wild birds. This virus is nasty and very contagious, and without some efforts by the people it will only continue to spread.
- J.P. Somonauk

AC said...

The outbreaks must be in Europe because that is where the disease must have started. How did it start though? What causes the disease? How long before it travels to different countries? A.L.C. Somonauk

Unknown said...

Had I not read this blog as well as the article I would not have been aware of the bird flu epidemic, a.k.a avian influenza, since it's not a concern in the United States. The article said that the virus affected wild birds, specifically swans, ducks, a goose and an eagle. If I was put in the position as a poultry expert I would do everything I could to confine the domesticated birds so they couldn't come in contact with the infected wild birds. I would do this by making sure the netting and caging is secure and intact, making is impossible for wild birds to enter. In doing so the likelihood of the influenza spreading would be lessened. -M.E.T

R.S. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
R.S. said...

Since the bird flu which is also called avian influenza is not an issue within the United States as of now, I had no clue it was currently affecting Europe either. Without reading this blog I would not have had any idea that this was going on in and around Europe and so rapidly. I am curious as to why there are so many outbreaks currently in Europe and how hard it will be to contain it before it spreads to more of the world. If I was an Ag/Poultry expert I would do my absolute best to contain any wild birds away from those that are raised on the farm. -R.S Somonauk

Marisa said...

Before reading, I didn't know that the bird flu had such a major impact. Avian influenza is affecting many wild birds including, geese and ducks. Thousands of birds are dying because of the bird flu. I think the word of bird flu should be spread so birds have a chance to be saved by people. Where did avian influenza first start and why is it spreading so fast? - M.P. Somonauk

McKenna said...

I remember learning that we share 65% of our DNA with other animals, like birds. Viruses can cross between humans and birds so what if we get it? What do we do? Are there any medications to treat this disease? It seems like the bird flu is a big issue that can cause certain types of birds to become extinct. Why is it only affecting the Poland/Germany area and will it come back to America? -M.M.P. Somonauk

Unknown said...

Why is it only affecting birds? Since it is affecting some of the birds that we eat, could it be transferred to humans? What is the main cause of the viruses? Is it caused by the humans that they are getting sick? -E.C. Somonauk

unknown said...

Currently, major outbreaks of this disease have been reported in the Netherlands, Germany, France, Hungary, Israel, and Poland. My question is: Why is it that these are the countries being affected? Also, the types of birds affected are wild birds, swans, ducks, geese, eagles, chickens, and layers. What is it about these species of birds that the disease is killing so many of them? -E.D. Somonauk

Brad Kinsinger said...

Love all the conversation Somonauk students! Hopefully we can get others from across the nation and world to get involved with you.

unknown said...

At the moment, there have been many breakouts of disease all over the world. After reading the article, I had understood a wider range of different influenza's causing outbreaks. My question is what is so different from Germany/Poland from the United States so that we are not affected as well? Also is there anyway to cure the disease within the birds who have it? S.T. Somonauk

unknown said...

The bird flu is a very serious matter that is currently affecting many countries. This type of influenza is a current global issue. Some of the countries being affected are The Netherlands, Germany, France, Hungary and Poland. Many of the birds being diagnosed are backyard birds. This includes swan, geese, and turkey. Many other wild birds have been diagnosed. I was very surprised when I read this article. I had know idea that so many countries were affected by the bird flu. I was also surprised they were all well developed countries.
KK- Somonauk

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